Yooperlites’ Appeal update: (Parts 1 & 2)

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PinkDiamond
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Yooperlites’ Appeal update: (Parts 1 & 2)

Postby PinkDiamond » Sun Apr 21, 2019 5:11 pm

Wow, I've seen this word before and wondered what they were, and now that I've seen them and read this story, I want to go to Michigan and collect some! Way cool, and this is part one from Rock & Gem, so we'll get to see more when I post part 2, maybe tomorrow, so watch for it or use the link in the story to access it now. I'll take you part way through the article and show you the first 2 pics, and I'll embed the video for you so you can find it here any time. Enjoy! 8-)

Yooperlites’ Appeal (Part 1)

Image
By Admin - April 9, 2019
By Wayne Peterson

"It’s been nearly two years since Erik Rintamaki of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula spotted something unfamiliar and utterly intriguing along the shores of Lake Superior under the setting sun and evening sky.

The discovery of fluorescent sodalite, which Erik named “Yooperlites,” caught the attention of geologists, mineralogists, rockhounds, educators, and just about anyone who had lived in or visited the Upper Peninsula at one time or another.

Naming Honors U.P. Citizenry

The origin of the name “Yooperlites” is the abated abbreviation of “U.P.” for Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. “Yoopers” are the area’s colloquial citizenry. “Lite” refers to the rock’s fluorescent properties from sodalite.

Image
This trio of Yooperlite specimens are part of the eye-catching display Erik presents at shows. (Photo courtesy Wayne Peterson)

Since making the discovery, Erik has spent quite a bit of time talking about Yooperlites and leading rockhounding tours. Of course, as a dedicated rockhound whose hobby is also his business (http://www.yooperlites.com), a good day rockhounding is a good day all around.

My wife, Brenda, and I had the good fortune of hearing Erik speak about his discovery and spending time with him in September of 2018. Early in our autumn travels, we went to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, one of our favorite rockhounding areas. A few years earlier, we successfully explored the western region of the U.P., so this time around we mapped out the eastern region to explore with hopes of finding prized Lake Superior agates.

The region is rich in mineral heritage and was the United States’ major supplier of copper for more than a century. From the mid-1840s to 1968, the Keweenaw Peninsula mines produced an estimated 10.5 billion pounds of copper.

Combing Lake Superior Shores

Our second day into the trip, we ... "



https://www.rockngem.com/yooperlites-ap ... ites041719
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Re: Yooperlites’ Appeal (Part 1)

Postby SwordfishMining » Sun Apr 21, 2019 5:51 pm

Here is a more scientific take on what they are from the Facebook group Fluorescent Minerals: "Alfred Ostrander As a geologist with an emphasis on mineralogy, I have to note that yooperlite is not a recognized name. Why can't amateurs hold off on not crowding the literature with varietal names, especially using the "ite" ending? This is just a disregard for science. Secondly, the author of the Rock and Gem article uses the work clast erroneously. The sodalite is not a clast in the syenite. Clastic rocks are sedimentary rocks made up of bits and pieces called clasts. Syenite is a coarse grained igneous rock similar to granite but deficient in quartz. The sodalite formed as the melt cooled. No clasts here. And as I understand it, the name is now a registered trademark. All legal but not good science. If I go up to the UP and find a piece of my own, it will not be labeled yooperlite. It will be labeled as a sodalite syenite, a perfectly good and fitting name from petrology, the study of rocks. It will sit on my shelf with a number of other sodalite syenites from around the world that do not have made up names. There, I have said my piece. I will get off my soap box now but I will always hope for better science in this collecting world we are part of."

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Re: Yooperlites’ Appeal (Part 1)

Postby PinkDiamond » Sun Apr 21, 2019 7:57 pm

LOL, don't get off your soapbox John, but I think you should share your info with the author over at R&G, and let us know what kind of response you get. I'm sure we all appreciate your corrections to the facts laid out in the article, so thank you very much. :)
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Re: Yooperlites’ Appeal (Part 1)

Postby PinkDiamond » Mon Apr 22, 2019 5:26 pm

I'm altering the subject to reflect that both parts are in this thread, and I'm looking forward to hearing your critique of this one too, John. I cut this one off at the 'Rockhounding at Night' heading so use the link to check that out. They also discuss rocks that could be mistaken for them, and give hunting tips if you'd care to try your luck at finding them. Enjoy! :)

Yooperlite Hunting (Part II)

Spotting Fluorescing Sodalite on the Shores at Night
By Admin - April 15, 2019

Image
A specimen of sodalite that’s been activated (placed under UV light). (Wayne Peterson)
By Wayne Peterson


"After a lifetime of interest in minerals and collecting specimens, and mining experiences, it never ceases to amaze me the diversity of minerals, various compositions, and formations.

Yooperlite is a unique formation of a fairly common element, fluorescing sodalite. What is uncommon is its presentation to the world at this time. There is always the hope of new discoveries. In speaking with many rockhounds and collectors with varying levels of interest regarding the Yooperlite discovery, one technical mineral collector summarizes his assessment as “but it’s only sodalite,” my response was incisive: “Yes, but Niagara Falls is only water ... amazing!”

Lake Superior Specimen Showcase

Image
Photographer and Yooperlite hunter Samuel Cavada refers to this Spray Paint pattern Yooperlite as a “Splatterlite” specimen.
(Samuel Cavada, bit.ly/GreatLakesFluorescentSodalite)


As I explained in the first part of this series (published in the April 2019 issue of Rock & Gem), meeting Erik Rintamaki, the person who discovered specimens of Yooperlite along the shores of Lake Superior and gave them their unforgettable name, and learning about his journey and the mineralogy of Yooperlite was enriching on so many levels.

One of the most memorable aspects of the time my wife, Brenda, and I spent in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula was the opportunity to go hunting for Yooperlites with Erik.

First, without the aid of UV light, I carefully studied his specimens of Yooperlite, noting color, density, grain patterns, and using a loupe to discover any other clue to possibly find specimens during the day. In daylight, they look like thousands of other rocks along the shoreline. They only reveal their hidden secrets and beauty in UV light.

After inspecting the Yooperlites, Brenda and I set out on our own to see if we could discover some in daylight. After several hours, we had 20 specimens we were sure would fluoresce. When we brought them back to Erik for review, all 20 failed the test. Erik then offered to take me out that evening, after the rock show, to teach me how to find Yooperlites. As you can imagine, I gladly accepted the offer.

Rockhounding at Night... "

https://www.rockngem.com/yooperlite-hunting-part-ii/
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Re: Yooperlites’ Appeal update: (Parts 1 & 2)

Postby SwordfishMining » Mon Apr 22, 2019 6:53 pm

Im not in this to make everybody agree. The folks at R&G read the same group posts I do. I'm more interested in finding something strange around here than worry about writers there. I could write articles for them if SOMEBODY let up the relentless attack on me. But that is just another way the W of the world suck the pleasure out of it for personal gain, lust, revenge, whatever that families problem is.

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Re: Yooperlites’ Appeal update: (Parts 1 & 2)

Postby OpalSpectrum » Fri Sep 13, 2019 8:39 am

the Crystal Collector just posted this vid


these rocks look surreal :shock:
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Re: Yooperlites’ Appeal update: (Parts 1 & 2)

Postby PinkDiamond » Fri Sep 13, 2019 4:23 pm

Fantastic OS! There's nothing like a video to show you exactly what to look for. I just wish they were in our waterways here, and not just 'Lake Gitche Gumee', which is what the Chippewa nation called Lake Superior. Way cool, thanks for posting! 8-)
PinkDiamond
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· ´¨¨)) -:¦:-¸.·´ .·´¨¨))
((¸¸.·´ ..·´ There are miracles left for you to do .... -:¦:- -:¦:-
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